October 2016 Climate Stats

Oct2016

October 2016 brought an end to a long period of little rain. It was the first month since March 2016 with above-normal precipitation, although Boise missed out on record precipitation experienced by most of the Pacific Northwest.

Oct2016_West_Precip_Percentile

Like other places in the Pacific Northwest, Twin Falls had their most precipitation on record in October unofficially, while other places were slightly above average. The general unsettled weather kept temperatures at night above average for the month, with average low temperatures at McCall the 2nd warmest on record in October.

2016OctClimate

 

Wildfire Burn Scars are a Flood Risk Infographic

Wildfire Burn Scars are a Flood Risk

Heavy rain can produce flash floods, mudslides & debris flows over burned areas from wildfires.  Water repellent soils are formed when organic material such as trees, scrubs, plants and litter burn at high intensity (high temperatures), causing water repellent compounds to become vaporized which then condense on cooler soil layers below the surface, which prevents the soil from absorbing water after a fire. During heavy rains, water cannot penetrate water repellent soil layers, so it runs off like pavement which causes dangerous flash flooding, debris flows and mudslides.

Drought Level since 2000 across Idaho and Oregon

Drought levels across Idaho and Oregon have improved since the recent drought from 2014-2015.  Here a look at the amount of area affected by drought in Idaho and Oregon. The graphs depict the state percentage of area affected by drought. Data is courtesy of the United States Drought Monitor.

Cn_FLV_VMAAd-H-