2019 Idaho Spring Flood and Water Resources Outlook

Spring Flood Potentialswe38

The potential for spring flooding due to snowmelt is slightly elevated for much of the central Idaho Mountains, particularly in the Big Lost and Wood River Basins, as well as the Upper Boise, Payette, and Weiser Basins. For the remainder of the state the spring flood potential due to snowmelt is average.

The primary factors in the development of spring flooding are the occurrence of persistent above normal temperatures, and rain on snow precipitation events. Even for areas that may have low snowpack, spring flooding is possible under the right scenario. Additionally, wildfire burn scars can have a significant impact on local flood potential during spring snowmelt.

Water Supplywatersupply

The water supply forecast for the spring and summer of 2019 is near average for the majority of watersheds across Idaho. Exceptions are some above average forecasts in the central mountains and Upper Snake Region, and some below average forecasts along the southern border and in the Idaho Panhandle.

Temperature and Precipitation

Wet weather at the beginning of the Water Year (Oct. 2018) was beneficial in recharging the soil moisture after a very dry and warm summer. However, fall precipitation as a whole was below normal across the state and subpar precipitation continued through most of January. February precipitation was exceptional across west-central and southern Idaho with much of the area receiving 200 to 300 percent of normal. February temperatures were well below normal across the state, especially in northern Idaho. Precipitation for the 2019 Water Year through February has been normal or above normal for most of central and southern Idaho, and a little below normal for most of the Panhandle Region. Mean temperatures for the 2019 Water Year have been near normal.

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Snowpack

As of March 8, snowpack from the Salmon River Basin to the southern border was above normal. The highest percentages were in the Big Lost Basin, Wood River Basins, Payette Basin, and Weiser Basin, ranging from 133 to 152 percent of median. Northern Idaho snowpack varied from 89 to 100 percent of median for the Northern Panhandle, Spokane, and Clearwater Basins. Idaho snowpack as a whole typically builds through March and peaks in early April.

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Reservoirs

Reservoir storage across Idaho is in good shape as of early March with major reservoir systems holding near average or above average water. Across southern Idaho, reservoir storage in the Bear River Basin was near 140 percent of average and Southside Snake River Basin storage was near 95 percent of average. The Upper Snake Basin and Wood River and Lost River Basins was near 125 percent of average. Storage in West Central Basins was near 98 percent of average, and the Clearwater and Panhandle Regions were near 97 and 104 percent of average. Weather patterns, irrigation demand, and flood control needs will drive reservoir operations over the next several months. Wet spring weather or extended periods of above normal temperatures resulting in rapid snowmelt could result in significant increases in reservoir outflows and river levels.

Drought

Moderate to severe drought plagued portions of Idaho through the fall and early winter, especially across southern Idaho and near the Utah and Nevada border. Drought conditions were eased by well above normal precipitation and a large increase in mountains snowpack during February. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor shows lingering drought across far southwest Idaho and along the Utah border. Weather and precipitation for the remainder of winter and this spring will determine whether or not drought conditions continue to improve or deteriorate.

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Long Range Outlook

The outlook for March through May favors above normal temperatures across Idaho. The precipitation outlook slightly favors wetter than normal conditions over far southeast Idaho, but does not shift the probabilities one way or another for the rest of the state.

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On-line Resources

Water Supply Volume Forecasts…
National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/ws/
National Weather Service-Colorado Basin River Forecast Center www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

For a comprehensive report on each river basin in Idaho, see the Natural Resources Conservation Service report:   Idaho Water Supply Outlook Report March 1, 2019

Snowpack Information…

National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/snow/
National Weather Service-National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Reservoir Storage…

Bureau of Reclamation Reservoir Storage  www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/select.html
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service https://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/basin.html

Drought Information…

U.S. Drought Portal www.drought.gov

Peak Flow Forecasts…

Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/peak/
Colorado Basin River Forecast Center www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/rmap/peak/peaklist.php

Temperature and Precipitation Outlook…

Climate Prediction Center  www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

2018 Idaho Spring Flood and Water Resources Outlook

M1The potential for spring flooding due to snowmelt is elevated for portions of eastern Idaho and northern Idaho. The spring flood risk for the rest of the state is average or below average. There remains an elevated risk of spring flooding across portions of the Upper Snake Basin due to above average mountain snowpack. This includes the mainstem Snake River above American Falls Reservoir and the Henrys Fork near Rexburg. An elevated flood risk also exists across the Panhandle Region where some of the highest snowpack percentages in the state reside. Elsewhere across Idaho, early May snowpack conditions suggest a low probability of spring flooding due to snowmelt. The primary factors in the development of spring flooding are the occurrence of persistent above normal temperatures, and rain on snow precipitation events. Even for areas where drought conditions exist, or that have low snowpack, spring flooding is possible under the right conditions. Additionally, burn scars can have a significant impact on local flood potential during spring snowmelt and rain events.M2

Water Supply

National Weather Service April through September water supply volume forecasts for northern and eastern Idaho, and the mainstem Snake River across southern Idaho range from 115 to 150 percent of average. Elsewhere, water supply forecasts are 85 to 110 percent of average for most of the Central Mountains and only 30 to 70 percent of average for south central and southwest Idaho. The lowest forecast percentages are in far southwest Idaho in the Bruneau and Owyhee River Basins at less than 40 percent of average.M3

Temperature and Precipitation

As of May 1, temperatures for the 2018 Water Year have been average or slightly below average across the northern half of the state while most of southern Idaho has experienced a little above average temperatures. Water Year precipitation was above average for the Panhandle, Spokane, and Clearwater Basins. The Clearwater Basin had the greatest anomalies in the state at 130 to 150 percent of average. The Salmon Basin and Upper Snake Basin near the Wyoming border were generally 100 to 130 percent of average. Elsewhere in southern and southwest Idaho the Water Year precipitation was mostly in the 70 to 90 percent of average range with pockets of around 60 percent.

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Snowpack

As of May 2, the highest snowpack percentages in the state ranged from 138 to 145 percent of median in the Clearwater, Spokane and Northern Panhandle Region. Not far behind were basins in eastern Idaho such as the Little Lost and Birch Basins, Henrys Fork, Teton, and Snake Basin above Palisades at 120 to 130 percent. The Payette, Boise, Salmon, Wood and Lost Basins ranged from 74 to 109 percent of median. Southside Snake River Basins along the Nevada border were a mixed bag ranging from a low of 17 percent of median in the Owyhee Basin to a high of 86 percent of median in the Raft River Basin. Northern Idaho basins and those near the continental divide reached their peak snowpack in mid to late April. The low elevation snow is gone and melting of the high elevations will increase over the next few weeks as temperatures warm.

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Reservoirs

Reservoir storage across Idaho is in good shape. As of May 1, storage in major reservoir systems throughout Idaho was 100 percent of average or greater, except where systems were heavily drafted to make space for anticipated snowmelt runoff. Weather patterns and irrigation demand will continue to drive operations through late spring as reservoirs are topped off. Wet spring weather or extended periods of warmth resulting in rapid snowmelt and large reservoir inflows could result in significant fluctuations in reservoir discharge and downstream river levels.

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Drought

Idaho is currently free from any official drought classification according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. However, below average precipitation for the Water Year and poor snowpack has put much of southern Idaho in the abnormally dry category. Weather and precipitation for the remainder of spring will determine whether or not conditions improve or deteriorate for areas experiencing the dryness. Good reservoir storage will ease drought concerns for those served by major storage projects.

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Long Range and Seasonal Outlooks

The outlook for May favors above normal temperatures across the state. The May precipitation outlook favors above normal precipitation for southeast Idaho and below normal precipitation for the northwest half of the state. The seasonal outlook for June through August favors above normal temperatures and below normal precipitation.

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On-line Resources

Water Supply Volume Forecasts…
National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/ws/
National Weather Service-Colorado Basin River Forecast Center www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Snowpack Information…
National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/snow/
National Weather Service-National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Reservoir Storage…
Bureau of Reclamation Reservoir Storage www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/select.html
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/basin.html

Drought Information…
U.S. Drought Portal www.drought.gov
U.S. Drought Monitor www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
National Drought Mitigation Center www.drought.unl.edu/

Peak Flow Forecasts…
Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/peak/
Colorado Basin River Forecast Center www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/rmap/peak/peaklist.php

Temperature and Precipitation Outlook…
Climate Prediction Center www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

 

Interested in measuring precipitation? Join the CoCoRaHS observing network.

Join CoCoRaHS Today!cocorahs

CoCoRaHS is a practical, enjoyable and useful activity. If you have an interest in weather and would like to help your local community, as well as scientists and others interested in precipitation, then CoCoRaHS is for you. It only takes a few minutes a day and gives you the chance to participate in real hands-on science. You’ll be amazed at what you learn as you become more aware of the variable weather that impacts you, your neighbors, your state and our entire country.

Data on the web

Volunteers submit their observations using the CoCoRaHS website or apps. Observations are immediately available to the public via maps and data analysis tools, and to data users via the CoCoRaHS Web API. Data users such as scientists, resource manages, decision makers and others have come to rely on the high density, high quality measurements provided by CoCoRaHS observers.

CoCoRaHS is Educational

CoCoRaHS offers learning opportunities too. In addition to training materials, newsletters and the ‘Message of the Day’, members also enjoy opportunities to attend Webinars featuring experts in weather, climatology and other pertinent disciplines. CoCoRaHS offers classroom resources for K-12 teachers. Students get to collect and submit real scientific data – all while meeting State and National Standards in science, math, geography and more!

What is CoCoRaHS?

The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, is a non-profit, community based, network of volunteers who measure and report rain, hail and snow in their backyards.

A brief History

CoCoRaHS came about as a result of a devastating flash flood that hit Fort Collins, Colorado in July 1997. A very localized storm dumped over a foot of rain in several hours while other portions of the city had only modest rainfall. The ensuing flood caught many by surprise, caused $200 million in damages, and resulted in five deaths. CoCoRaHS was born in 1998 with the intent of doing a better job of mapping and reporting intense storms. CoCoRaHS became a nationwide volunteer network in 2010 and is now international with observers helping provide critical precipitation observations, benefiting their country’s needs.

Volunteers of all ages welcome!

Individuals and family volunteers of all ages and all walks of life are the foundation of the CoCoRaHS network, Anyone can help. It only takes a few minutes to check the rain gauge and report your observations.

Training: “the Key to our success”

It is important that all CoCoRaHS precipitation reports be accurate and consistant. Training is provided on how to install gauges, properly measure precipitation and transmit reports. CoCoRaHS precipitation reports are accurate and very useful.

Why is there so much interest in rain, hail and snow?

Precipitation is essential for life. It varies greatly with topography, storm type and season. It really is true that it may pour on one side of the street and be dry on the other. A portion of a field may be pounded by hail while others nearby receive no damage. Snowfall may pile up in one neighborhood and only dust another. Rain, hail and snow are fairly easy to measure, and the data collected are very important. Meteorologists, hydrologists, engineers, builders, farmers . . . you name it, everyone seems to care about rain, hail and snow. That’s why we ask, “How much fell in your backyard?” There are limited observations across southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon, compared to the rest of the country, so we would love to have your observations. To learn more about the CoCoRaHS program and to see where your fellow observers have recorded rain amounts, visit http://www.cocorahs.org/.

Invite your neighbors, relatives and friends by sending them this “Join” link: http://www.cocorahs.org/application.aspx

Idaho Spring Flood and Water Resources Outlook

The potential for spring flooding due to snowmelt is slightly elevated for portions of eastern and north central Idaho. The spring flood risk for the rest of the state is average to below average. SWE-2-12

Good soil moisture recharge from autumn rains and well above average reservoir storage has resulted in a slightly elevated threat of spring flooding along the mainstem Snake River in eastern Idaho, and along smaller tributaries above Idaho Falls. Spring flood risk is also slightly elevated in the Clearwater Basin which is currently holding one of the greatest snowpack percentages in the state. Elsewhere, the absence of low elevation snow and areas of below average mid elevation snow suggest an average or below average spring flood threat.

The primary factors in the development of spring flooding are the occurrence of persistent above normal temperatures, and rain on snow precipitation events. Even for areas that have low snowpack, spring flooding is possible under the right scenario. Additionally, wildfire burn scars can have a significant impact on local flood potential during spring snowmelt.

Precipitation and Temperature

As of early February, Water Year precipitation was near normal or above normal for the Panhandle, Spokane, Clearwater, and Salmon Basins, as well as the Upper Snake Basin near the Wyoming border. The Clearwater Basin had the greatest anomalies at 130 to 150 percent of  average. Aside from the Snake River headwaters region, Water Year  precipitation across southern Idaho stood at 60 to 80 percent of  average with south side Snake River Basins having the lowest  percentages.  Average temperatures for the Water Year have been above average for almost the entire state, especially across southern Idaho. 1

 

Snowpack

As of February 12, the highest snowpack percentages in the state were 114 and 116 percent of median in the Clearwater Basin and the Upper Snake above Palisades. Percentages were 91 to 107 percent of median for basins along the Montana border in eastern Idaho, and the Salmon, Spokane, and Panhandle Basins. Elsewhere in south central and southeast Idaho the snowpack was 57 to 81 percent of median, decreasing to 33 to 49 percent of median in the Owyhee and Bruneau Basins in southwest Idaho. Daily snowpack readings indicate record low levels for a handful of SNOTEL locations in southern Idaho.  Mountain snowpack in Idaho typically builds through March. Early April snow conditions will be pivotal to water supply conditions through the summer.  23

Reservoirs

Reservoir storage across Idaho is in good shape. Major reservoir systems across the northern half of the state were holding near average or above average storage as of February 1. Across the southern half of the state, with the exception of Brownlee at 85 percent and Mann Creek at 45 percent of average, most major projects had well above average storage which is great news considering the below average snowpack in many basins. Weather patterns, irrigation demand, and flood control needs will drive reservoir operations over the next several months. Wet spring weather or extended periods of above normal temperatures resulting in rapid snowmelt could result in significant increases in reservoir outflows and river levels.

Drought

After record setting precipitation and snowpack last year, abnormally dry conditions have returned to portions of west central and southern Idaho. Weather and precipitation for the remainder of winter and this spring will determine whether or not conditions improve or deteriorate for areas experiencing short term dryness. Good reservoir carryover will help ease drought concerns for those served by major storage projects.

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Long Range Outlook

The outlook through the end of February favors below normal temperatures and normal or below normal precipitation for the state. The outlook for March, April, and May favors below normal temperatures for the Panhandle, and above normal temperatures across far southern Idaho. The precipitation outlook for March, April, and May slightly favors wetter than normal conditions for the Panhandle, but does not shift the probabilities one way or another for the rest of the state.

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Water Supply Forecast

National Weather Service April through September water supply volume forecasts vary from 90 to 135 percent of average for most of the central Idaho mountains and north across the Clearwater and Panhandle regions. In southern Idaho, forecasts for the Big Lost Basin, the mainstem Snake River and tributaries above American Falls range from 80 to 125 percent of average, with the exception of Willow Creek near Ririe with a forecast of 38 percent of average. Forecasts for the rest of southern Idaho range from 39 to 73 percent of average with the lowest percentages in southwest Idaho. These forecasts may change considerably over the next couple of months since seasonal snow accumulation and rainfall typically occur during February, March, and April.

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Online Resources

Water Supply Volume Forecasts…
National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/ws/

National Weather Service-Colorado Basin River Forecast Center
www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/

USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service
www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Snowpack Information…

National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center
www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/snow/

National Weather Service-National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center
www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/

USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service
www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Reservoir Storage…
Bureau of Reclamation Reservoir Storage
www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/select.html

USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service
www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/basin.html

Drought Information…
U.S. Drought Portal
www.drought.gov

U.S. Drought Monitor
www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

National Drought Mitigation Center
www.drought.unl.edu/

Peak Flow Forecasts…
Northwest River Forecast Center
www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/peak/

Colorado Basin River Forecast Center
www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/rmap/peak/peaklist.php

Temperature and Precipitation Outlook…
Climate Prediction Center
www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

Winter 2016 and Spring 2017 Flood Summary

This past winter and spring had its share of flooding across southeast Oregon and southwest Idaho.  Not only did spring runoff bring flooding to rivers and streams, but ice jams and snow melt caused flooding during the winter as well.  The stage was being set for an active spring flood season as far back as October 2016, when 150 to 400 percent of normal precipitation occurred across much of the region which moistened the soil profile.  The winter storm track brought well above average snowfall to most of southeast Oregon and southwest Idaho, with extreme snowfall across lower valleys.  A relatively cool and wet early spring was the final piece of the puzzle to ensure abundant spring runoff.  An indicator of how wet this past winter and spring have been, water supply forecasts for the April through September period rank in the top 10 for most of southeast Oregon and southwest Idaho, dating back to 1970.  Additionally, all major reservoir systems either have filled or are expected to fill.  Record high precipitation was seen across many areas from December 2016 through June 2017, shown in the figures below.

pnw_cl (3) pnw_cl (4)

The map below shows March 1 snow pack along with areas where flooding had a significant impact.

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Although the threat of snow melt flooding has diminished, summertime thunderstorms can pose a serious flood risk.  Areas of steep terrain and areas burned by wildfire are at particular risk for flash flooding due to thunderstorms.  For flood safety information, visit http://www.floodsafety.noaa.gov/.  For the latest river conditions, see http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=boi.

Idaho Spring Flood and Water Resources Outlook – Mar 1, 2017

The potential for spring flooding due to snowmelt in 2017 is well above average across most of southern Idaho. Meanwhile, the spring flood potential is about average for northern Idaho. One thing to remember is that swe31mountain snowpack in Idaho generally peaks in early April, leaving several weeks to add to our snowpack and the flood potential.

The storm track through the winter has been very favorable for southern Idaho, resulting in an exceptional snowpack across the southern half of the state. Relatively warm weather accompanied by rain in February caused much of the snow in the lower valleys of southern Idaho to melt. However, substantial low elevation snow remains across portions of south-central and eastern Idaho. Additionally, well above average mid and high elevation snow exists across southern Idaho with a number of SNOTEL sites measuring record or near record snowpack. Across the northern half of Idaho, snowpack is near average.

The primary factors in the development of spring flooding are the occurrence of persistent above normal temperatures, and rain on snow precipitation events. Even for areas that have low snowpack, spring flooding is possible under the right scenario. Additionally, burn scars can have a significant impact on local flood potential during spring snowmelt.

Precipitation and Temperature

Water Year to date precipitation was above normal for almost all of Idaho. Percentages were highest in the Panhandle, Central Mountains, south-central and southeast regions, where 150 to 300 percent of average precipitation occurred. Lowest percentages in the state were across west-central and southwest Idaho at 100 to 130 percent of normal. Average temperatures have been average to below average across northern, and most of central and southwest Idaho. Across southeast Idaho, the average temperatures have generally been a little above average for the Water Year.

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Snowpack

As of March 1, snowpack was above median across southern Idaho with record or near record snowpack across much of south-central and extreme southeast Idaho. Percentages ranged from 157 to 192 percent of median in the Wood and Lost River Basins, Snake Basin above Palisades, Bear River, Raft River, Blackfoot, Willow, and Portneuf Basins. Elsewhere south of the Salmon River, basin percentages were generally 110 to 140 percent of median. Across the Clearwater, Spokane, and Panhandle Regions, snowpack ranged from 87 to 99 percent of median. Mountain snowpack in Idaho typically builds through March, and early April snow conditions will be pivotal to water supply conditions through the summer.

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Reservoirs

Basin-wide reservoir summaries as of March 1 indicate average to above average storage across most regions of Idaho. Large inflows on the Owyhee System in February boosted reservoir levels to 100,000 acre-feet above average. This was a welcome site after multiple years of drought and below average reservoir levels on the Owyhee System. Weather patterns and irrigation demand will drive reservoir operations over the next several months. With the exceptionally large snowpack across much of the south, above average reservoir outflows and high river levels are a good bet on rivers of southern Idaho this spring.

Drought

Abundant autumn rain and a good winter precipitation have erased drought conditions across the state according to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor. Weather and precipitation through this spring will determine whether or not conditions continue to improve before heading into the warm and dry season. The U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook suggests that drought conditions are not likely to return to Idaho through the spring.

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Long Range Outlook

The outlook for March, April and May indicates equal chances of above normal, normal, or below normal temperatures across Idaho.  Probabilities slightly favor above normal precipitation during the period.

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Water Supply Forecasts

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National Weather Service April through September water supply volume forecasts vary from 115 to 225 percent of normal for the southern half of Idaho. Across the northern half of Idaho, percentages are generally 100 to 115 percent of average for the April through September period. These forecasts may change considerably over the next couple of months due to seasonal snow accumulation and rainfall that occur in March and April.

Resources

Water Supply Volume Forecasts…

National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/ws/
National Weather Service-Colorado Basin River Forecast Center www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Snowpack Information…

National Weather Service-Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/snow/
National Weather Service-National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center www.nohrsc.noaa.gov/
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/id/snow/

Reservoir Storage…

Bureau of Reclamation Reservoir Storage www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/select.html
USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/basin.html

Drought Information…

U.S. Drought Portal www.drought.gov
U.S. Drought Monitor www.droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
National Drought Mitigation Center www.drought.unl.edu/

Peak Flow Forecasts…

Northwest River Forecast Center www.nwrfc.noaa.gov/peak/
Colorado Basin River Forecast Center www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/rmap/peak/peaklist.php

Temperature and Precipitation Outlook…

Climate Prediction Center www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

Wildfire Burn Scars are a Flood Risk Infographic

Wildfire Burn Scars are a Flood Risk

Heavy rain can produce flash floods, mudslides & debris flows over burned areas from wildfires.  Water repellent soils are formed when organic material such as trees, scrubs, plants and litter burn at high intensity (high temperatures), causing water repellent compounds to become vaporized which then condense on cooler soil layers below the surface, which prevents the soil from absorbing water after a fire. During heavy rains, water cannot penetrate water repellent soil layers, so it runs off like pavement which causes dangerous flash flooding, debris flows and mudslides.

Drought Level since 2000 across Idaho and Oregon

Drought levels across Idaho and Oregon have improved since the recent drought from 2014-2015.  Here a look at the amount of area affected by drought in Idaho and Oregon. The graphs depict the state percentage of area affected by drought. Data is courtesy of the United States Drought Monitor.

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Balloon Sighting over Boise

Did you notice a weird object in the sky during the evening?  It resembled a star in the early evening when stars aren’t usually present.  It was a balloon at 61,000 feet! These balloons belong to the Google Project Loon.  These balloons are visible on FlightRadar24.com with the HBAL callsign.

Balloon Tracking - Courtesy of FlightRadar24.com

Balloon Tracking – Courtesy of FlightRadar24.com