September 2018 Climate Statistics

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With only a trace of rain, September 2018 was one of the driest Septembers on record. There were only 9 others with no measurable precipitation in 152 years of Boise area records, and only 5 others in 78 years of airport records.

Total precipitation for the four months from June through September was only 0.36 inch. June-September periods with so little precipitation are unusual, but not unique. For example:

1994 .44
1901 .39
1898 .37
2018 .36
1957 .31
2012 .31
1933 .27
1966 .27
1935 .19

Temperatures averaged only slightly above normal.  September began with near normal temperatures under dry westerly flow aloft. The flow backed into the southwest on the 5th as a high-pressure ridge built over the northern Rockies. This resulted in the last 90-degree highs of the summer on the 5th, 6th, and 7th.

A cooling trend commenced on the 8th as an upper-level low-pressure trough from the Gulf of Alaska approached the British Columbia Coast. As the trough edged closer, a dry cold front passed Boise on the 10th, followed by cooler north Pacific air. Highs were only in the low 70s from the 11th through the 13th.

The trough remained parked over the west coast through the 18th, keeping temperatures a few degrees below normal. It finally moved inland on the 19th, then continued east out of our area on the 20th.

Brief warming followed on the 21st and 22nd, with highs in the low 80s, but another north Pacific trough was on the way.

Rather than stalling over the coast, this trough continued on an eastward track, pushed along by a building upper-level high-pressure ridge offshore. The trough was east of our area on the 24th. Like its predecessors, it produced no rain in the Boise area.

East of the ridge, northwest flow aloft over the Pacific Northwest states kept temperatures 5 to 10 degrees below normal, with highs of only 69 on the 24th and 25th, the first highs in the 60s since June 17. The low of 38 on the 24th was the first low in the 30s since May 2.

As the eastern portion of the ridge edged inland, warmer air raised temperatures above normal from the 27th through the 29th, with highs in the low 80s.

During that time, an upper-level low was drifting slowly eastward toward California. By the morning of the 30th, it was centered over the Oregon-northern California coast. Its only effect on Boise was a few clouds and slightly cooler temperatures.

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